CD118: How to Get Your Name on the Ballot

In this special episode, we take a look at the different rules for getting on the ballot for the House of Representatives in all fifty States, and take a look at how some States made it way too hard for Independents to qualify.


Please support Congressional Dish:

  • Click here to contribute with PayPal or Bitcoin
  • Mail Contributions to: 2244 Oak Grove Rd, P.O. Box 30507, Walnut Creek, CA 94598
  • Click here to shop on Amazon – Congressional Dish will receive a referral commission.

Thank you for supporting truly independent media!


Ballot Access Information

Alabama

Alaska

At-large state

Arizona

Arkansas

California

As of the 2012 election, California has had a top-two primary system; in order to get on the General Election ballot, you have to be one of the top two vote getters in the Primary election.

Top 2 Primary clearly benefits Republicans and Democrats

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 9.14.05 AM

 

To appear on the Primary Election ballot, a candidate needs to either collect signatures or pay a fee, or a combination of the two.

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

At-large state

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

In Hawaii, candidates, regardless of party, need to run in the Primary Election and receive at least 10% of the votes cast for the office or receive a vote equal to or greater than the lowest vote received by the partisan candidate who was nominated.

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Candidates need to collect signatures or pay a filing fee to be on the General Election ballot

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

At-large state

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

Official petition counts will not be released until March 2016.

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

At-large state

Ohio

Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, candidates need to pay a filing fee or collect signatures in order to appear on the General Election ballot

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

At-large state

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

As of the 2008 election, Washington has had a top-two primary system; in order to get on the General Election ballot, you have to be one of the top two vote getters in the Primary election.

To qualify for the Primary Election:

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

At-large state


Music Presented in This Episode


Cover Art

Design by Only Child Imaginations

OCI